About Me

where I get to talk about myself


“It seems to me that Canadian sensibility has been profoundly disturbed, not so much by our famous problem of identity, important as that is, as by a series of paradoxes in what confronts that identity. It is less perplexed by the question "Who am I?" than by some such riddle as "Where is here?”

― Northrop Frye, The Bush Garden

It's such a typical coming-of-age question, but as much as the presence of the question no longer acts as a great burden to my mind, I realize that I'm still lacking the answer. The question seems harmless and straightforward, but as it becomes rephrased to attempt to be answered, into

- What defines a person,

which branches out to

- what are the essentials to defining a person, and what cumulatively would completely define a person (if at all possible)

and soon the questions are multiplying in your hands like rabbits.

This is exactly like solving a math equation, where it gets longer and longer as you add stuff to figure out what you can figure out, except for this question, well, I've had no luck with getting it to boil down to a nice little x=5.

But then, maybe I just started this wrong. Surely it's not so hard to write up a simple who-am-I page; everyone does it. It's like driving a car. It seems terrifying and impossible that one could manipulate this hot hunk of steel to go at the speed of a cheetah at high time, but your neighbor's sixteen-year-old kid can do it. It seems ridiculously impossible but is actually perfectly logical.

Right? (I don't have a driver's license.)

So there. Now, I'll try not to digress so much at the expense of your time—I'm holding it hostage, you see, and realizing that I have no way of getting it back to you—and give this a stab.

Ehem.

Well.

I call myself Diane Catsburrow Linnet. I gave myself that name (and the domain of this website) when I was a small bushy-tailed kid who wanted to become a Newbery novelist, and to this day, where I am neither bushy-tailed nor a minor—still small—it is serving dutifully as my pen name and an explanation to my existence: I love cats and I love to burrow in all the stuff I begin. I am also allergic to them (cats, not projects) and therefore the ways I can get involved with them is quite limited. So unless this allergy magically resolves itself, I cannot join the club of people who uploads pictures of their adorable feline companions. Sorry.

Instead of cat photos, I will have cat pictures (like what you saw ↑) since I am a daydreamer and an artist. I'm always thinking—often leads to overthinking—and fantasizing about what I could make; and while I seldom think out loud, I enjoy thinking on paper, doodling or scribbling. As a writer and a draftsperson, the line between drawings and words are often quite fine, and typically that works just as well.

For a brief professional history, I published a book entitled "Abigail’s Flight and other stories" on 2015. I’ve also worked on a literary magazine for three years, which feels like a short time now that the last issue's date—July 2016—is a significant time ago, but certainly built my project management and design muscles to a full ARGH! As a college student, though not for much longer now, I am studying Studio Art, English, and Creative Writing at Dickinson College. Academic and non-academic experience pursuits have taken me to British Columbia, Rome, Michigan, and currently, this small college town in Pennsylvania.

I'll try not to bog you down with too much detail on what I write and what art I make, as there are separate pages dedicated for those topics and I would hate to 1) repeat myself; and, 2) bore you. I think I'll just say that I like to write anything, and I like to make art with anything too. I write novels, short stories, nonfiction (memoirs; they say I'm not old enough yet but I feel like if I don't start now, I will have forgotten a lot of fun stuff by the time I am) and, with some hesitation, poetry.

With visual art (my major is actually Studio Art, but I tend to do more art outside of a "studio" and thus am hesitant to borrow my diploma for this conversation) I love using all sorts of media, some favorites being various pens, charcoal, and paint (in other words, everything) and also get utterly thrilled by the terrifying prospect of trying to make art with something I've never used before. 

Some other things I do are making animations, graphic design—as in, aside from making this website, doing posters, book covers, booklets, etc—web coding, swing dance... I no longer keep a list of hobbies, as I got confused on what gets grouped as serious ambitions and what as leisure spendings and never figured it out, but I still like bringing up how I like to spend my time and money. They serve as good conversation starters. 

I used to collect notebooks before realizing that it was counterintuitive, to put it lightly, to buy a craft-colored ruled 80-page hardcover book and then try to figure out what to use it for. So now I buy sketchbooks and moleskins when I have a use for them, and know what I want. Instead, I collect pens. It's great; I'm always losing them so there can never be too many (well, my wallet might howl) and with pens, it's fine to get a medium-firm 3mm felt tip then figure out what I could use it for. I always find uses for all sorts of pens. It's just that sometimes that use it not immediate, and I "save it," until it dries out.

I obsess over fonts, and spend my spare time browsing art and design stuff, and researching web coding to see what functionalities I could slap on and then troubleshoot. I've recently gotten into ceramics; I just can't figure out pinch pots, but coiling is so tactile, and so... logical. It feels to me like clay follows logic like nothing else. And if it was folded once, well, it'll remember that it was folded once. Long after I forget. And learn the hard way.

There's a different between something ending, or concluding, and just stopping. I think for the moment, I might have to just stop. But I hope you will stick around, read and look at some more art and writing stuff here. We'll get to know each other over virtual coffee/tea.